My stream is under construction

17 posts tagged ui

The Sketchbook of Susan Kare, the Artist Who Gave Computing a Human Face


The genius of Steve Jobs, Jef Raskin, and the rest of the Mac team was recognizing a huge untapped market for home computing among artists, musicians, writers, and other creative weirdos who might never have cared enough to master the arcane complexities of a command-line UI or blow a fortune on hulking digital workstations.
The challenge of designing a personal computer that “the rest of us” would not only buy, but fall crazy in love with, however, required input from the kind of people who might some day be convinced to try using a Mac. Fittingly, one of the team’s most auspicious early hires was a young artist herself: Susan Kare.

The Sketchbook of Susan Kare, the Artist Who Gave Computing a Human Face

The genius of Steve Jobs, Jef Raskin, and the rest of the Mac team was recognizing a huge untapped market for home computing among artists, musicians, writers, and other creative weirdos who might never have cared enough to master the arcane complexities of a command-line UI or blow a fortune on hulking digital workstations.

The challenge of designing a personal computer that “the rest of us” would not only buy, but fall crazy in love with, however, required input from the kind of people who might some day be convinced to try using a Mac. Fittingly, one of the team’s most auspicious early hires was a young artist herself: Susan Kare.

Wikipedia: Isotype

The first rule of Isotype is that greater quantities are not  represented by an enlarged pictogram but by a greater number of the  same-sized pictogram. In Neurath’s view, variation in size does not  allow accurate comparison (what is to be compared – height/length or  area?) whereas repeated pictograms, which always represent a fixed value  within a certain chart, can be counted if necessary. Isotype pictograms  almost never depicted things in perspective in order to preserve this clarity, and there were other guidelines for  graphic configuration and use of colour. The best exposition of Isotype  technique remains Otto Neurath’s book International picture language (1936).
“Visual education” was always the prime motive behind Isotype, which   was worked out in exhibitions and books designed to inform ordinary   citizens (including schoolchildren) about their place in the world. It   was never intended to replace verbal language; it was a “helping   language” always accompanied by verbal elements. Otto Neurath realized   that it could never be a fully developed language, so instead he called it a “language-like technique”.

Wikipedia: Isotype

The first rule of Isotype is that greater quantities are not represented by an enlarged pictogram but by a greater number of the same-sized pictogram. In Neurath’s view, variation in size does not allow accurate comparison (what is to be compared – height/length or area?) whereas repeated pictograms, which always represent a fixed value within a certain chart, can be counted if necessary. Isotype pictograms almost never depicted things in perspective in order to preserve this clarity, and there were other guidelines for graphic configuration and use of colour. The best exposition of Isotype technique remains Otto Neurath’s book International picture language (1936).

“Visual education” was always the prime motive behind Isotype, which was worked out in exhibitions and books designed to inform ordinary citizens (including schoolchildren) about their place in the world. It was never intended to replace verbal language; it was a “helping language” always accompanied by verbal elements. Otto Neurath realized that it could never be a fully developed language, so instead he called it a “language-like technique”.

The (Xerox Star Icon) World According to Norm Cox
Wikipedia says:

The Star workstation, officially known as the Xerox 8010 Information System, was introduced by Xerox Corporation in 1981. It was the first commercial system to incorporate various technologies that today have become commonplace in personal computers, including a bitmapped display, a window-based graphical user interface, icons, folders, mouse, Ethernet networking, file servers, print servers and e-mail.

Theory and Research in HCI Blog:

Norm Cox was the visual designer for the Xerox “Star” in the late ‘70s.  The Star was the first product to include a graphical user interface, as  we know it. Norm created the original bitmaps for the Star’s icons. To  the best of my knowledge, Norm was the first designer to draw the  document icon with the corner turned down, the folder icon, the printer  icon, and so many others. Stop for a minute and consider the impact  those bitmaps have had on our lives and our work.  Norm’s  background was in art/design/architecture. He’s described those first  attempts at using early paint programs as being like trying to draw with  a rock on the end of your pencil. And yet he was able to distill the  essence of the desktop metaphor into 16x16 pixels in renderings so  simple and clear that they have truly become iconic in the broadest  sense of the word.

See also: Digibarn: Xerox Star 8010 Interfaces, high quality polaroids (1981)

The (Xerox Star Icon) World According to Norm Cox

Wikipedia says:

The Star workstation, officially known as the Xerox 8010 Information System, was introduced by Xerox Corporation in 1981. It was the first commercial system to incorporate various technologies that today have become commonplace in personal computers, including a bitmapped display, a window-based graphical user interface, icons, folders, mouse, Ethernet networking, file servers, print servers and e-mail.

Theory and Research in HCI Blog:

Norm Cox was the visual designer for the Xerox “Star” in the late ‘70s. The Star was the first product to include a graphical user interface, as we know it. Norm created the original bitmaps for the Star’s icons. To the best of my knowledge, Norm was the first designer to draw the document icon with the corner turned down, the folder icon, the printer icon, and so many others. Stop for a minute and consider the impact those bitmaps have had on our lives and our work. Norm’s background was in art/design/architecture. He’s described those first attempts at using early paint programs as being like trying to draw with a rock on the end of your pencil. And yet he was able to distill the essence of the desktop metaphor into 16x16 pixels in renderings so simple and clear that they have truly become iconic in the broadest sense of the word.

See also: Digibarn: Xerox Star 8010 Interfaces, high quality polaroids (1981)

loading...